Change Management Glossary Page 2 0f 3 (E-Q)

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A comprehensive change management glossary that contains more than 200 terms providing clear and simple descriptions to boost your organisational change management knowledge. This glossary pertains to the Leadership of Change®. Please feel free to utilise our a2B Change Management Glossary below. If you find it useful, please consider buying our paperbacks and electronic books.

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Eight Wastes of Lean: TIM H WOOD is an acronym for the 8 wastes commonly found within business: Transport, Inventory Motion, Human, Waiting, Over production, Over processing, Defects.


Emotional Intelligence: The ability to monitor your emotions or the emotions of others and use this to guide your actions during the change. Leaders of change need to recognise and regulate emotions in themselves and others. As change management professionals, we engage employees and impacted stakeholders, relying on them to adopt the change and ensure benefits realisation.

Employee: An individual who was hired by an employer to perform a specific role that adds value to the organisation. Successful change depends on AUILM® and/or a2B5R® support. Along with processes and systems, they play a significant role in organisations.


Employee Behaviour: The way in which employees respond to specific circumstances or changes in the workplace.

 

Employee Change Engagement: Is a workplace approach that creates a growth mindset environment where employees feel valued, two-way communication is in place, they are motivated, committed to their organisation’s goals and values, and contribute to organisational change success.

Employee Engagement: A workplace approach resulting in the right conditions for all employees of an organisation to feel passionate about their jobs, be committed to their organisation’s goals and values, and be motivated to contribute to organisational change and success.

 

Employee Process System Data (EPSD): Four critical elements that need to be aligned by the change team during organisational change implementation.


Enabler: A positive facilitator to successful change. These can be individuals actively or passively supporting change or anything that has the potential to improve change implementation success.

Entitlement: Employees with a sense of entitlement believe that they are owed favours by the organisation and should get what they want because of who they are. Others might observe their worthiness as unrealistic, unmerited, or inappropriate.


Estimated Completion Date (ECD): The expected date an action or deliverable should be complete.


Execute Phase: The second phase of the a2B Change Management Framework® (steps five to eight) which focus on change implementation.


Facilitator: The person responsible for guiding and supporting employees through the change process interactively.


Fixed Mindset: Employees with a fixed mindset will, by default, reject and resist disruption and change. This will prevent true change. Their assumption is that change is usually always bad, and they stick to what they know.


Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR): Describes exponential change in the way we live, work and relate to one another. 4IR includes the adoption of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things and the Internet of Systems.


Frame of Reference: A set of criteria or stated values in relation to perceptions and judgements that can be made by employees. How the employee or change target interprets what they see in terms of their own cultural frame of reference.


Future State: The future state ‘B’, when employees have adopted the new way of working and the benefits have been realised.

 

Gap Analysis. The difference between current 'a' state and future 'B' state. Gap analyses identifies the changes or improvements that are needed to establish the organisation's future state. Eliminating or closing the gap is the purpose of most change or improvement initiative.


Governance: The decision-making processes, applied by authorised individuals or teams, for approving/rejecting, monitoring and adjusting activities of the project change plan (PCP).

GROW Coaching: A popular structure for change leadership coaching to guides the conversation with the person being coached to talk about the: Goal – what they want to achieve, Reality – where is that person now, what things are getting in their way, Options – what can be done in order to help them reach their goal and Will and wrap-up – create a plan of action and the motivation to carry out that plan.


Growth Mindset: These employees embrace disruption and change to improve organisation performance. Setbacks are opportunities to learn (CANI) and an individual’s effort and attitude determine success.

Gap Analysis. The difference between current 'a' state and future 'B' state. Gap analyses identifies the changes or improvements that are needed to establish the organisation's future state. Eliminating or closing the gap is the purpose of most change or improvement initiative.


Governance: The decision-making processes, applied by authorised individuals or teams, for approving/rejecting, monitoring and adjusting activities of the project change plan (PCP).

GROW Coaching: A popular structure for change leadership coaching to guides the conversation with the person being coached to talk about the: Goal – what they want to achieve, Reality – where is that person now, what things are getting in their way, Options – what can be done in order to help them reach their goal and Will and wrap-up – create a plan of action and the motivation to carry out that plan.


Growth Mindset: These employees embrace disruption and change to improve organisation performance. Setbacks are opportunities to learn (CANI) and an individual’s effort and attitude determine success.


Hubris: Leaders with excessive pride and over confidence which manifests itself as a major barrier to change implementation success.


Hunch and Launch Syndrome: A name given to the process of coming up with a change idea (hunch) and then introducing (launch) it into the organisation without strategic consideration or a plan on how the benefits will be realised. These ideas rarely deliver strategic change or sustainable benefits and are sometimes referred to as ‘pet projects’.

 

Incremental Change: Small strategic improvements or adjustments that will improve organisational performance but will not alter the organisation’s core.

 

Indifferent Delegator: A standpoint during change implementation when the leader tries to delegate change leadership responsibility to a direct report, makes it appear as though they are supporting the change programme but remain fully focused on normal day-to-day operations.


Individual Performance Plan (IPP): An instrument used to establish performance expectations and support the performance evaluation of each employee, usually linked to the balanced scorecard and an individual’s bonus.


Intervene: The third element of a leader’s role in organisational change. They should ‘Intervene’ when they observe an employee resisting change, or when employees are not adopting the new skills and behaviours.


Intervention: All the planned programme activities that aim to bring changes into an organisation. They are led by the sponsor and the leadership team.


Key Performance Indicators (KPI): A set of quantifiable measures that a company uses to gauge its performance over time. These metrics are used to determine an organisation’s progress in achieving its strategic (change) and operational goals. They also compare a company’s finances and performance against other businesses within its industry.


Knowledge Transfer: The process of transferring knowledge from the change programme to other parts or systems within the organisation. Like knowledge management, knowledge transfer seeks to capture, organise, create, or distribute knowledge and ensure its availability for future change teams.

Kumbaya Change Leader: An employee or consultant who through misunderstanding, misdirection, deception or delusion makes others believe that organisational change implementation is easy.
 

Leader: An individual in the organisation who is responsible for leading, directing, commanding, or guiding a group or activity to create value. Characteristics of a leader; sets direction, inspires, innovates, motivates, empowers create a vision for the future.


Leadership: The leaders of the organisation are collectively responsible for strategy execution and its inherent change programmes.

Leader of Change®: A person in the organisation who is responsible for leading; directing, commanding, or guiding a group or activity in success organisational change implementation. Without a leader of change leading the change programme, it is likely to fail. The change leader’s role in organisational change is to ‘Articulate’ the change vision, ‘Model’ the new behaviours and ‘Intervene’ to reinforce the change.

Leadership Alignment: This process develops change leadership capability so the organisation’s leaders are aligned, as a high performing team, with change leadership skills and knowledge to successfully lead the organisation’s change, transformation or improvement to accelerate employee change adoption and deliver sustainable long-term benefits.

Leadership of Change®: Encompasses change management concepts, models, depictions, assessments, tools, templates, checklists, plans, a roadmap and glossary structured around the ten-step a2B Change Management Framework®. The delivery vehicles are change management books, change management gamification manuals, leadership alignment workshops and masterclasses.


Lean: A process improvement methodology, focused on reducing waste in a system. The term lean is derived from the idea that the approach reduces ‘waste’ that contributes to inefficient processes and poor outcomes.

 

LESK Change Expert: A person, usually a self nominated adviser, who speaks or attempts to advise on change management implementation with limited experience, skills, or knowledge.


Lessons Learned: The sum of knowledge gained from the change programme. This should be used as a reference, input and points of interest for future change programmes or projects.

 

Manager: An individual who is responsible for controlling or administering an organisation or group of staff to create value. Characteristics of a manager; sets specific goals, provides structure for the team, solves problems and plans.


Master Project Plan: The wider project plan that drives the change or transformation across the organisation and coordinates activities performed by the work streams. The project change plan (PCP) should be aligned with the key milestones on the master project plan and both plans should be updated simultaneously. In some cases, there may only be a PCP.


Mentoring: A process of providing support, challenge and extension of the learning of one person through the guidance of another who is more knowledgeable and experienced.


Merger: The combination of two or more separate companies into one. Most mergers involve the integration of operations, processes, assets, management and organisations.


Milestone: An important date or deadline, the start or end of significant phases of work shown on the project change plan (PCP). It is usually reflected as a diamond symbol.


Mission: Describes the overall purpose of the organisation. Each organisation’s statement can vary widely in terms of content, stretch and scope.


Model: The second element of a leader’s role in organisational change. It is an activity expected from the organisation’s leader (and sponsor). They should ‘Model’ the new skills and behaviours, providing a role model to other staff.


Narcissistic Leader: A leader with excessive self-confidence and an obsessive focus on their personal image, accompanied by contempt for anyone who thinks that the organisation’s strategic change programme is more important than them.


Normal Day-to-Day Operations: The activities that an organisation and its employees engage in on a daily basis for the purposes of generating a profit and increasing the inherent value of the organisation.

Nose Bleed Boss (NBB): A person usually in direct supervision of an subordinate who advises you how you should proceed when travelling extensively to engage your challenging clients and stakeholders while at the same time having a nose bleed as soon s the leave the office.


Observers: One of three employee change standpoints during change implementation. ‘Observers’ will monitor the ‘Advocates’ and assess if the change is benefiting them. If this appears positive, they will tend to move towards being receptive to the change.

 

Operating Plan: A social arrangement for achieving controlled performance in pursuit of collective goals.

Organisation: A social arrangement for achieving controlled performance in pursuit of collective goals.


Organisational Development (OD): A process for instigating, implementing and sustaining change, it involves activities that impact employees, the team and the organisation.

Organisation Technology Employee Adoption Gap (OTEAG): There is an organisation technology employee adoption gap (OTEAG) globally in many organisations. There is a gate in the rate of technology development which is moving faster than the vast majority of employees want or can adopt to improve organisation performance.

Organisational Values:  Guiding principles and core beliefs that provide an organisation with purpose, direction and what is important. They help companies manage their interactions with both their employees and customers.

 

Organisational Vision: A concise statement defining an organisation’s long-term direction, the vision is a summary statement of what the organisation ultimately intends to become in five to fifteen years into the future. A strong vision should motivate and enable employees to see how their effort contributes to the organisation's purpose.


Outcome: A specific measurable result or effect of an action or situation.

Parallel Universe Leader Syndrome: A place that mirrors the poor performance, weakness, errors of leaders, etc, but in their mind, it does not happen in reality and can be quickly discounted as an illusion or their follow can spin as incorrect.

PESTEL Analysis: The acronym for a tool used to analyse the macro (external) forces facing an organisation. PESTLE stands for Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal.

Pet Projects: Projects directed or supported by the CEO or other senior leaders that appeal to their emotions and hubris. They rarely deliver strategic value.

 

If you find it useful, please consider buying our paperbacks and electronic books.

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Leadership of Change®

Change Management Body of Knowledge (CMBoK)

Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, A, B, C, D & E

Change Management Body of Knowledge (CMBoK), Leadership of Change® Body of Knowledge, Peter F Gallagher, Change Management Books, Leadership of Change Volumes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E, Change Management Fables, Change Management Pocket Guide, Change Management Handbook, Change Management Gamification, Change Management Adoption, Change Management Behaviour, Change Management Leadership, Change Management Sponsorship
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